Croc Caves of Ankarana

We traveled over 2 KM, in absolute dark, through an underground river full of bats, eels and blind fish to find one of the rarest Crocs in the world.

Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Red Roughed Lemur

They are one of the rarest lemurs in the world. And to see one, you have to go to a small Island off the coast of Madagascar. Then maybe... just maybe - you'll see one!

Adรฉlie

The cutest penguin of them all! Imagine standing amongst a hundred thousand birds in one of the most remote places on the planet. This is bucket list stuff.

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call โ€œThe Hippo Whisperer!โ€

This Week’s Top Picks
We traveled over 2 KM, in absolute dark, through an underground river full of bats, eels and blind fish to find one of the rarest Crocs in the world.
You might be surprised, but in the forests of Madagascar lives one of the loudest mammals on the planet! This is an audio experience you have to hear for yourselves!
Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.
Millions of wildebeest roam the Serengeti every year. But did you know, thousands can die in one day... in one spot? We were there!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
In Southern Alberta, Canada, there is a piece of nature that is the very last of it's kind - less than one percent remains... and these folks are trying to save it!
The cutest penguin of them all! Imagine standing amongst a hundred thousand birds in one of the most remote places on the planet. This is bucket list stuff.
They are one of the rarest lemurs in the world. And to see one, you have to go to a small Island off the coast of Madagascar. Then maybe... just maybe - you'll see one!
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1 day ago

Great BIG Nature

This is an interesting photo.
We all know how clever primates are. The genetic difference between human beings and primates is less than two percent. Therefore it shouldn't be too surprising when we see an orangutan using a spear tool to catch a fish. This extraordinary image was taken in Borneo on the island of Kaja.
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Photo: Gerd Schuster
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This is an interesting photo.
We all know how clever primates are. The genetic difference between human beings and primates is less than two percent. Therefore it shouldnt be too surprising when we see an orangutan using a spear tool to catch a fish. This extraordinary image was taken in Borneo on the island of Kaja.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Gerd Schuster

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Keep em coming Brian & Dee. Really engaging for a whole range of people and so important for that reason.

Amazing picture! But most likely that he’s not fishing, he might try to catch something that fell into the water?!

Zakir Ibrahim

Connect with nature. This is very important advice. When we care about Nature, we don't allow others to destroy it. Thank you, Great BIG Nature

I love you Brian and Dee Keating u are so pure and loving , am so excited to introduce you and your good work to community change agents of rwenzori birds and during environmental education to students . Connect with nature.

Domagoj Bilandลพija

Where you get those photos N' information?๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿค˜

Sure hope he caught it!

Awesome

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2 days ago

Great BIG Nature

I wonder what song he's listening too?
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I wonder what song hes listening too?
Connect with Nature!

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‘Merrily we snail along snail along...’

Wow, they do look like headphones don’t they ๐Ÿ‘€

The Star Wars theme song

Sopa de caracol ๐Ÿ˜

So cute! Love it!

Domagoj Bilandลพija

I think We all stand together ๐Ÿ˜‰

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1 week ago

Great BIG Nature

This is a series of photos taken in sequence of a Puffin coming in for a landing. Puffins are called several names based on their appearance. Puffin is thought to come from the word puff, meaning swollen, because they do appear rather round. They have also been referred to as the 'clowns of the ocean' thanks to their amusing expression and colourful beak. They are also sometimes confused for penguins, but unlike penguins, puffins can fly.... barely. Despite their stout bodies and short wings, puffins can fly as fast as 88 KPH (55 mph), but not without some serious effort: They have to flap their wings 300 to 400 times per minute to stay aloft. And to see them land in person, well... lets just say it always looks like an accident waiting to happen!
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Photos: Richard Shucksmith
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Awesome photos! Puffins are my absolute favourite bird ๐Ÿ’™

Emma hope you see these! Great photos of Puffins.

Amazing thank you for sharing that

Hermosas criaturas ... bendiciones...

Great and funny description!

Fabulous

Fantástico!!! Super fotografía!!

Awesome ๐Ÿ‘

Cool

Hermoso!!!

Mes oiseaux préférés, de vrais clowns. Merci pour la photo. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ˜

Alondra Barreto

Domagoj Bilandลพija

Jacqueline King

Muero de amorrrrrrr๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜

We started calling them cannon balls with wings. They are such a delight to watch!

They are funny! I see them in Newfoundland :)

Wow! Beautiful! Pelicans land without grace as well ๐Ÿ˜†

Such fun little birds to watch. Much more graceful in the water.

Coming from NFLD I celebrate these wondrous birds.

Great facial expressions ๐Ÿ˜‚

Wow, those photos are spectacular! Puffins are funny and cute and awkward and beautiful at the same time.

Fabulous images!!

Coming into land. Flaps up. ๐Ÿ˜…. Wonderful photos.

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1 week ago

Great BIG Nature

The Eyes of A Gecko!
Geckos just might have the coolest looking eyes on the planet!
Most geckos species are nocturnal, and they are particularly well-adapted to hunting in the dark. The sensitivity of the gecko eye has been calculated to be 350 times higher than humans. Basically they can see things, especially in the dark, we couldn't even dream of!
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Photo: Ian Schofield
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The Eyes of A Gecko!
Geckos just might have the coolest looking eyes on the planet!
Most geckos species are nocturnal, and they are particularly well-adapted to hunting in the dark. The sensitivity of the gecko eye has been calculated to be 350 times higher than humans.  Basically they can see things, especially in the dark, we couldnt even dream of!
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Ian Schofield

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me gusta mucho los animales salvajes y la naturaleza

Saludos. Alguno de uds. , podría explicarme , que es lo que ven los gekos en la oscuridad ; que los seres humanos , no podemos ver ? . Gracias...

Awesome

Very jurassic Park love it

Sorry to have to disagreed, but that's one creepy looking eye. ;-)

Wouldn’t you just love to be able to see in the dark?

What a glorious example of nature's wonders!

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Great close up!

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2 weeks ago

Great BIG Nature

This is a very interesting photo.
You are seeing a Black Vulture preening a Crested Caracara. Why is one bird species helping out another? The act is known as Inter-specific allopreening - a symbiotic relationship. Iโ€™ll scratch your back if you scratch mine sort of thing. As Vultures are circling over a dead carcass and eventually landing to feed, Caracaras will give out warning calls of predators (something vultures canโ€™t do due to lack of a syrinx). So basically, the vultures will give their friends a beauty treatment every once in a while because they want them to stick around! Their lives sometimes depend on it. Nature works in mysterious ways!
Photo: Ron Chiasson
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This is a very interesting photo.
You are seeing a Black Vulture preening a Crested Caracara. Why is one bird species helping out another? The act is known as Inter-specific allopreening - a symbiotic relationship. Iโ€™ll scratch your back if you scratch mine sort of thing. As Vultures are circling over a dead carcass and eventually landing to feed, Caracaras will give out warning calls of predators (something vultures canโ€™t do due to lack of a syrinx). So basically, the vultures will give their friends a beauty treatment every once in a while because they want them to stick around! Their lives sometimes depend on it. Nature works in mysterious ways!
Photo: Ron Chiasson

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Discordo do texto que diz que o urubu está a coçar o carcará. Ele está procurando parasitas para comer e o carcará permite por instintivamente saber que está a se livrar deles.

now why cant we humans act this way ?

Interesting to find out if this has become a full fledged adaptation for the two species or a learned behavior. If it was leanred, the two would have to live communally or at least side by side. There's a university project.

I think Black Vultures are just naturally one of the nice guys in the avian world. They don't even kill for their food. โค

Have seen this post three times now. Never gets old. Symbiotic relationships in non-human species could teach humans a lot, but we are not intelligent enough to learn from them.

Yes & humans must do so too. Ban all war & help eachother instead. And See who can do more FOR others.

Thanks for the gorgeous picture and information!!

Maybe birds are also capable of altruism, like elephants

Such beautiful Symbiosis. Like monkey in a fruit tree throwing down the fruits where the deer wait!

I love nature. Humans can learn from other species. I wish.

Cena interessante pois carcarás e urubus são inimigos territoriais e é comum ver carcarás atacarem urubus.

Nature always works in cooperation. Xx

Mae It's my first time hearing inter-specific allopreening. I only know parasitism, commensalism and mutualism. ๐Ÿคฃ

Thank you for the info and great shot.

Echt niet die gier zegt kom hier met dat kapsel of ik hak je kop er helemaal af... types jaloezie ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜

So fascinating and what a great shot!

Sure thing Jungle Jim, but more likely it's a big juicy tick there just waiting to be snacked on! Get real!

Alejo Perlaza me confirmas? sí es verdad que no tienen siringe pero no encontré nada de ese mutualismo.

An act of kindness! Wow, maybe we all need to look @ animals for guidance.

Frequently see a single Caracara with Vultures eating road side carrion in Hendry county

I photographed both species together in Costa Rica a few years ago. Very interesting how they work together.

I would think they are just good friends. Vultures don't need other birds to warn them of predators

The Crested Caracara is another of my favorite FL birds.

We could learn a thing or two from them!

3pm if it is not too hot for you.

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2 weeks ago

Great BIG Nature

If anything... nature is resiliant!
Connect with Nature!
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If anything... nature is resiliant!
Connect with Nature!

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Truely,truely amazing!

It's called a nurse log.

Read Powers' The Overstory and you'll be captivated by it.

Amazing and so reassuring ๐ŸŒณ๐Ÿ’š๐ŸŒฟ

Kill one and 4 will come ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿฝ

Desire to live

Awesome

Wonderful

Amazing!

That is amazing.

Just incredible!

I’ve seen ficus do this but not conifers ๐Ÿ˜ณ

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