Croc Caves of Ankarana

We traveled over 2 KM, in absolute dark, through an underground river full of bats, eels and blind fish to find one of the rarest Crocs in the world.

Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Red Roughed Lemur

They are one of the rarest lemurs in the world. And to see one, you have to go to a small Island off the coast of Madagascar. Then maybe... just maybe - you'll see one!

Adélie

The cutest penguin of them all! Imagine standing amongst a hundred thousand birds in one of the most remote places on the planet. This is bucket list stuff.

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

This Week’s Top Picks
We traveled over 2 KM, in absolute dark, through an underground river full of bats, eels and blind fish to find one of the rarest Crocs in the world.
You might be surprised, but in the forests of Madagascar lives one of the loudest mammals on the planet! This is an audio experience you have to hear for yourselves!
Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.
Millions of wildebeest roam the Serengeti every year. But did you know, thousands can die in one day... in one spot? We were there!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
In Southern Alberta, Canada, there is a piece of nature that is the very last of it's kind - less than one percent remains... and these folks are trying to save it!
The cutest penguin of them all! Imagine standing amongst a hundred thousand birds in one of the most remote places on the planet. This is bucket list stuff.
They are one of the rarest lemurs in the world. And to see one, you have to go to a small Island off the coast of Madagascar. Then maybe... just maybe - you'll see one!
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2 months ago

Great BIG Nature

A man scrambling for parking and karma came soon after ... See MoreSee Less

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Good day everyone. We are proud to say we have just re-launched the Great Big Nature facebook page. We were hacked a few months back - and to say that facebook was less than helpful would be an understatement. As such, we have set up a new facebook page at greatbignature (no spaces), since we were unable to gain access to our old page. If you like, please follow. Connect with Nature!

highly illegal

Ok so we either know it's fake/setup or the guy in the jeep is a brain dead moron, what he did is most likely illegal in pretty much any country, moving someone else's car with out their consent is just a douche move, so he stole your spot, would it really be worth going to jail or having a record for a parkin g spot, that said I think it's fake/set up. To Great BIG Nature I'm sorry your page is still hacked, I really do hate how facebook operate, the good guys get screwed and the pages who spread bullh!t can't put a foot wrong, it's backwards.

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3 months ago

Great BIG Nature

This image shows three full years of tracking a single male Rough-legged Hawk. These incredible tracks show just how far these birds travel! First captured while on migration in Montana on Oct 10, 2017, as a 2-year-old, this hawk has provided 15,866 GPS locations to add to the world's largest dataset on this important species. It literally flew up to the far ... far north of Canada (tip of the Northwest Passage), then headed west to parts of the Northwest Territories and back down to Colorado - unbelievable! Prior to this research we had no idea they traveled such a wide range.
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Photo / Research Credit: Neil Paprocki / The Rough-legged Hawk Project
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This image shows three full years of tracking a single male Rough-legged Hawk. These incredible tracks show just how far these birds travel! First captured while on migration in Montana on Oct 10, 2017, as a 2-year-old, this hawk has provided 15,866 GPS locations to add to the worlds largest dataset on this important species. It literally flew up to the far ... far north of Canada (tip of the Northwest Passage), then headed west to parts of the Northwest Territories and back down to Colorado - unbelievable! Prior to this research we had no idea they traveled such a wide range. 
Connect with Nature!
Photo / Research Credit: Neil Paprocki / The Rough-legged Hawk Project

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Dear Great BIG Nature. Where the stops in the northeast part of Canada are is in Nunavut. Yes, sometime was spent in the Yukon and NWT.

my friends and i banded hundreds of raptors on the great lakes flyway in the 70's

we used to see many rough legged on the great lakes migration route

thats bob steffens not jeanne4 i banded a ferruginous rough legged many years ago its interesting it returned to same area in co.{loos like}.

What I find the most interesting is that it roams and meanders but seems to consistently head south along the Front Range to a specific location in Colorado. Five tracks into that location considering its first track was northward in Montana. I'm curious why it seems to consistently head to that spot each year.

Lol looks like he teleported to Vegas for his holdays

That will be like trying to find a restaurant in the near future for our next meal out!!

Not sure if I’m more amazed that all the points together look like a hawk in this picture or that it flew that far 🤷‍♂️

Rough-legged Hawks are among my favorites. I first saw them nesting in the cliffs of the Shaler Mtns inof NW of Victoria Island in the 1960s. I now enjoy seeing them wintering here in Montana. Tough Arctic Explorers that they are. Thanks for the info.

Doesn't even stop at customs. How rude!

It's funny too because I saw a nesting rough legged hawk in that area, maybe it was the same bird lol

I find it interesting that iits migration travels through Alberta and then travels east. Instead of migrating through Manitoba

That’s how you social distance

Birds are amazing. We have seen a turkey with limping leg in our neighborhood for few months.

Santa Claus....????

Looks like he found a girlfriend up near the NW Passage

Wonder if he went back where he started?

South for winter looks like a fixed point, summers up north more wherever the mood takes them.

somebody should do a study on the swainsonhawk that only a few are nesting in the elgin il area not sure if they are still there though. very rare in il.\

That bird flew over the area where I was working in the Arctic just west of Bathurst Inlet, cool

Coolest thing I’ve about brother hawk. Thanks

I guess he may have been visiting a couple of old girlfriends! 😍

Amazing how far they travel

Maybe he’s the one in my shelterbelt right now. He’s been in my area many times

I assume the darkest area where he spent a lot of time was nesting area? Can time of year be extrapolated to confirm that?

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3 months ago

Great BIG Nature

Aboriginal tribes around the world have always had a close relationship with nature - but here's something you might not know. Estimated to be the oldest man-made structure on earth, the Brewarrina Aboriginal fish traps on the Barwon River in New South Wales, are over 40,000 years old. These stone fish traps are evidence of engineering skill, knowledge of river hydrology & fish biology, ask 10 different people what they think is the oldest surviving manmade structure on earth and chances are you will get 10 different answers. The pyramids of Egypt or Central America? Not even close. Stonehenge? A relative newcomer. The Neolithic farmhouses of the Orkney Islands, or the Great Wall of China? At 7,000 years of age, the oldest of these barely registers alongside the granddaddy of them all - the Ngunnhu fish traps of Brewarrina.
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Aboriginal tribes around the world have always had a close relationship with nature - but heres something you might not know. Estimated to be the oldest man-made structure on earth, the Brewarrina Aboriginal fish traps on the Barwon River in New South Wales, are over 40,000 years old. These stone fish traps are evidence of engineering skill, knowledge of river hydrology & fish biology, ask 10 different people what they think is the oldest surviving manmade structure on earth and chances are you will get 10 different answers. The pyramids of Egypt or Central America? Not even close. Stonehenge? A relative newcomer. The Neolithic farmhouses of the Orkney Islands, or the Great Wall of China? At 7,000 years of age, the oldest of these barely registers alongside the granddaddy of them all - the Ngunnhu fish traps of Brewarrina.
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Also extensive stone fish traps and structures in Western Vic on the world heritage list. Amazing!

I live this sort of thing. But it seems astonishing that they could even be there considering how much nature, the land, would normally change in such a long time! Anyone .. ??

We have a similar thing in South Africa. Goggle Kosi Bay fishtraps.

Much better at sustainable fishing in the old days. Not like human today, harvest once abd kill the rest with their fish nets

Jan Underhill

How do they know it was 40,000 yrs ago?

Connect with Nature, catch it, kill it and eat it!

40,000 years old????

no estoy de acuerdo en eso ya que así acaban y exterminar a todos los peces aquí también se practica algo parecido a esas trampas y agarran hasta las crías de los peces evitando su proliferación y aumentando su extinción .

That's amazing, wow! Thanks Brian for all you research and do! Sharing :)

Very cool!

Josh Watts

they are a lot bigger than the pictures, they are finding more and more. the drought helped.

Lightning bushfires for hunting and forest management was a regular aspect of traditional practices in Australia

Amazing

Kool

Amazing info. Thanks !

Thats cool

Brilliant

Sinead Maria

Brad Moggridge great pic too

Amazing

That is amazing to know, my ancestors (Inuit) also did this when the fish lakes were migrating from lake to ocean or vice versa, confuses fish easily and that’s how they get trapped

Fantastic

I demand proof , or its fake cnn news ...

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3 months ago

Great BIG Nature

The trunk of the African Elephant is one of, if not the most, sensitive and useful appendages on the planet. We could only wish we had one!
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3 months ago

Great BIG Nature

They just might be the cutest squirrel in the world!. The adorable 'Ezo Momonga' is a type of 'Dwarf Flying Squirrel' unique to Hokkaido island in Japan, and they naturally exist nowhere else on the planet. Japanese flying squirrels are strictly nocturnal creatures (which is one reason they have those big beautiful eyes) and spend their days high up in boreal, evergreen forests. These rodents are silent gliders and move quickly among tops of trees soaring 100 m (328 ft) at a time, and rarely do they descend to the ground. And because a main source of their diet is pine seeds, they are a major spreader of new seedlings throughout the forest - so they are extremely important to the ecosystem. But man... are they cute!
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Photo Credit: Masatsugu Ohashi
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They just might be the cutest squirrel in the world!. The adorable Ezo Momonga is a type of Dwarf Flying Squirrel unique to Hokkaido island in Japan, and they naturally exist nowhere else on the planet. Japanese flying squirrels are strictly nocturnal creatures (which is one reason they have those big beautiful eyes) and spend their days high up in boreal, evergreen forests. These rodents are silent gliders and move quickly among tops of trees soaring 100 m (328 ft) at a time, and rarely do they descend to the ground. And because a main source of their diet is pine seeds, they are a major spreader of new seedlings throughout the forest - so they are extremely important to the ecosystem. But man... are they cute!
Connect with Nature!
Photo Credit: Masatsugu OhashiImage attachment

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Diane Becker

🇨🇦🐾🐾OOOOOOOOHHH TTTOOOOOO CCCUUUUUUUUTTTTTEEEEEEE

Becky Hall

Emily Hays 💓

David Boyle

Alicia Kiri

Melanie Dawn 😍

Davyon Henderson♥️

This is why Anime exists.

Aawww they are so cute. I’d be feeding them all the time

Adorable.

OMG Kelley Valaitis Koering Brenda Rocabella 😍

Mariah Martinez

Domagoj Bilandžija

Cute

Lindsey Michie

Mandy Turner

Wholly buckets! So adorable 😍

Adorable

Everyone needs to see this cute face!

Those eyes! 💜💜

Jacqueline King

They r so adorable so soft and cuddly looking

Andrea Jones show Sophie this and see if it goes on her list haha

Melody Munford

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3 months ago

Great BIG Nature

In a surprising twist, butterflies hunt Caiman - well, just their tears to be exact. And the reason being - the insect is in pursuit of nutrients and minerals - chiefly salt. Those that drink tears are referred to as “lacryphagous,” from lacrima, the Latin word for “tear.” It also happens that sodium and some of those other micronutrients are hard to find in nature, so these critters have to get inventive. And since Caiman will sit still for long periods of time... well, that makes them the prefect target. Its even been noticed, that some of the bolder winged beauties will irritate their host's eyes to produce more 'salty" eye drops. And we dont think it bothers the Caiman - but this guy doesn't seem to be all that amused either!
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Photo credit: Mark Cowen
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In a surprising twist, butterflies hunt Caiman - well, just their tears to be exact. And the reason being - the insect is in pursuit of nutrients and minerals - chiefly salt. Those that drink tears are referred to as “lacryphagous,” from lacrima, the Latin word for “tear.” It also happens that sodium and some of those other micronutrients are hard to find in nature, so these critters have to get inventive. And since Caiman will sit still for long periods of time... well, that makes them the prefect target. Its even been noticed, that some of the bolder winged beauties will irritate their hosts eyes to produce more salty eye drops. And we dont think it bothers the Caiman - but this guy doesnt seem to be all that amused either!
Connect with Nature
Photo credit: Mark Cowen

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extraordinaire ! merci pour vos magnifiques et rarissimes photos 🤗🤗🤗🤗

Jaooo leptirice Domagoj Bilandžija

she's all dress up for lunch........she's smiling

Who’d have thought. Our earth is an amazing place

lolol he does look rather annoyed

Oooo. I want some

Awesome

i think so...she femal..❣️

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